Medal Ribbon Case

Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly


Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly
Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly
Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly
Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly
Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly
Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly
Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly
Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly
Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly
Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly
Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly
Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly

Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly    Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly

Here's a handsome example of one of my favorite portable typewriter models: a Smith-Corona Classic from the 5X series, cleaned and serviced, with a fresh ink ribbon installed -- ready for your use right out of its "Trimline" carrying case. This machine, whose serial number dates it to 1964, is one of Smith-Corona's most user-friendly designs. Mechanically, it's completely functional. Everything works: every key and every control. Here's a one-minute clip of the typewriter at work.

Smith-Corona 1964 Classic typewriter demo - YouTube. Collecting and repairing typewriters has been a hobby of mine for some 40 years, and even though this is the brand I know best, I continue to learn new things with almost every machine I restore. The Sterling 5X seems to have been a model that Smith-Corona decided to label the"Classic" for a couple of reasons.

(warning: geeky interlude follows here). This typewriter is essentially identical -- in every respect but the nameplate on the front panel -- to the rightly beloved Sterling 5AX series. The 5AX Sterling was a transitional design, its bodywork recalling the iconic 5 series of the 1950s. Mechanically, this machine has all the working features (and build quality) of the legendary Silent-Supers of the 1950s, and of the restyled Galaxie models that were introduced at the end of that decade. This machine, like the 5AX Sterling, has a full keyboard including the number 1 and exclamation point; it has the pop-up paper holder, touch control, the removable platen, and tabs that can be set and cleared from the keyboard. So we had the Sterling series in the 1950s, with the 5A prefix. Then came the slightly modernized Sterling with the 5AX prefix, for just three years beginning in 1963. In 1964 this Classic model appears with the 5X prefix, and in 1966 Smith-Corona introduces a new "Super Sterling" with Galaxie-like lines; apparently somebody in marketing insisted on adding the Super to the name to make sure people understood it was New and Improved. And in that same year of 1966 these twin models, the Sterling 5AX and the Classic 5X disappear. I'm guessing here, but one possible reason this model bears the "Classic" name is that Smith-Corona, by 1964, was preparing to retire the 5AX series and release a new generation of typewriters bearing the Sterling name (which dates to the mid-1930s), a design based closely on the more sharply faceted Galaxie. Was Smith-Corona intending to continue making this machine but with the new Classic label so as not to confuse it with the new Super Sterling? In my research online I haven't been able to find an answer. And I realize this is a small detail, but the 5AX and 5X models were the last typewriters from Smith-Corona to feature steel release levers at the ends of the carriage.

SCM's subsequent models had plastic levers, which can be counted upon to need replacement or epoxying after 30 or 40 years. I recently connected with a typewriter collector in California who has learned to make replacements with his digital 3-D printer, but they're not cheap. The 5AX/5X Sterlings are highly regarded among collectors and users of portable typewriters. Archivist of the online Typewriter Database, author and guru on all things typewriterish -- describes the 5AX as a machine which really bring[s] the best features of the Galaxie to the smaller and more attractive Super-5 body, and might be the best typewriter design ever in terms of being rich in features and simple to use. The original, unretouched paint is a putty tone -- I believe it's the color Smith-Corona called Dawn Gray.

The most visible cosmetic imperfections are evidence of honest use, not abuse: abrasions in the paint at corners of the bodywork (from being moved in and out of the carrying case), and at the left edge of the ribbon cover. Aside from these cosmetic issues, this typewriter's paint, its working parts and all its chrome bits are notably clean and corrosion-free. I have left untouched a feature which speaks to this 57-year-old machine's history: the top cover bears a silver sticker from the Warwick, R. It's worth noting that while most of us go through any number of phones, laptops and similar devices over the years, quite the opposite is true of typewriters. Properly cared for, a good typewriter will serve a succession of owners.

This machine is going strong after half a century and, with care, will still be working well half a century hence. I'm delighted with the way this one turned out. A specimen page is the nearest thing I can offer you to a test-drive, and I encourage you to examine these sample images, presented both in the machine and in a digital scan. The typing touch of this machine is crisp and responsive. Vertical spacing can be set at one line, two or three. The type pitch is pica, 10 characters to the inch -- the larger of the two most common type sizes. The item "Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly" is in sale since Friday, February 5, 2021. This item is in the category "Collectibles\Pens & Writing Instruments\Typewriters". The seller is "spanghew" and is located in Edgartown, Massachusetts. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Antigua and barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Montserrat, Turks and caicos islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Uruguay, Russian federation.

  1. Modified Item: No
  2. Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  3. Material: Steel
  4. Featured Refinements: new ribbon
  5. Type: Manual
  6. Year: 1964
  7. Features: Portable
  8. Vintage: Yes
  9. Brand: Smith Corona


Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly    Smith-Corona 1964 Classic Typewriter with case & new ribbon Working perfectly